Matt Hillyer's Last Supper Club ft. Dalton Domino

Afallon Presents

Matt Hillyer's Last Supper Club ft. Dalton Domino

Sun, April 23, 2017

Doors: 5:00 pm / Show: 6:00 pm

Live Oak Music Hall

Fort Worth, TX

$10.00 - $15.00

This event is all ages

Matt Hillyer
Matt Hillyer
Matt Hillyer, also known as “Matt the Cat” and as the leader of Dallas-based and beloved Honky-Tonk band Eleven Hundred Springs is, rather simply, an artist. Few artists stick to a single, narrow path as they wander, viewing things in a philosophically unique way than many non-artist types might.

With the release of Hillyer’s debut solo album, the Lloyd Maines-produced If These Bones Could Talk, we get to see a new side to Hillyer’s country-gold vision, but to be clear, his solo foray isn’t the end of Eleven Hundred Springs, which was formed in 1998, nor is it the death of the rockabilly-flavored Matt the Cat Trio. Hillyer as a solo artist with a fresh group of players, including some buddies from Eleven Hundred Springs, is merely a fascinating, new chapter to a musical life that’s never been conventional, and isn’t going to be anytime soon.

With 11 new songs, all written or co-written by HIllyer except for his rocking, stomping cover of the Everly Brothers’ classic the “Price of Love,” a rare occurrence has taken place. The leader of a popular, established band has branched out to go on a personal, musical vision quest, and has come back with a sound that satisfies on all levels. In some ways, These Old Bones resembles the stone-cold country of his band, but the new collection has increased the sonic value of everything he’s affiliated with, thanks to spreading his tattooed, whiskey-soaked wings a bit.
The notion for a solo record came from a wonderfully personal spot that’s as honest as it is meaningful to Hillyer.

“I was very close with my Grandmother, he says. “She was always pushing me to do it. She loved Eleven Hundred Springs, but she really wanted me to make something with my name on it. So, over the years, it started to seem like a good idea as I did more solo acoustic shows. It also seemed like a good idea for me to have a CD of my own to sell at some of those shows. Then when these songs started to come out in my writing, I really wanted to make this happen.”

While cuts such as “Home is Where the Heartbreak Is” certainly recalls a familiar Buck Owens-esque brightness and “Try Not to Take it So Hard” has the classic Texas Tornadoes playfulness some of Eleven Hundred Springs best tunes boast, one listen to “Dancing With the Moon,” a smooth, soft romancer of a tune, and it’s clear Hillyer’s found another gear of country storytelling that is only the beginning of a new era for him, whether it’s solo, as a trio or leading “Eleven Hondo.” The same can be said for the begging-to-be-two stepped-to “I Still Have a Lot of Falling Left To Go,” as it’s gentle fiddle leads Hillyer through a piano-twinkling sawdust shuffler that doesn’t kick the footlights as hard as some of his other band’s best tunes do.

Hillyer acknowledges the similarities between his past band-related works, but highlights the differences in a manner that’s clear with drama-free simplicity.

“To me it always boils down to the material, he says. “I know there are songs on this album that I would not have put on an Eleven Hundred Springs album. Even the songs that would fit like a glove on an Eleven Hundred Springs album are, for the most part, rooted in very personal places. When the collection of these songs started to really come together it became apparent to me that the majority of them felt like something I was trying to say independent of a group.”
Dalton Domino
Dalton Domino
Chances are if you see them live on a Saturday night, more than likely you will wake up with your ears ringing and a hangover on Sunday morning. It’s safe to say that Dalton Domino and the Front Porch Family Band puts on more of a party rather than a performance. Their music is a gritty blend of fast energetic southern rock with a hint of everything from Americana, Red Dirt and Texas Country to Delta Blues and Soul.

Dalton Domino has made a splash on the Texas Music scene. In the last couple of months Domino won the Larry Joe Taylor singer/songwriter contest to perform at Larry Joe Taylor Fest; played on the Texas Red Dirt Roads w/Justin Frazell; released his debut single "Killing Floor" which made it to number 1 on the Top 5 at 5 on the Red Dirt Rebel for a month; and started recording a full length album. Needless to say, Domino and his band have been busy.

The road to success for Domino started two years ago when he moved to Lubbock, Texas after reading about the many musicians who got their start at The Blue Light Live, including Josh Abbott, William Clark Green, and Red Shahan of Six Market Boulevard. Domino started playing Monday nights at singer songwriter night at the Blue Light and soon met up with Levi Fowler (harmonica), Michael Moad (bass), Beau Bolfing (guitar) and formed The Front Porch Family Band.

The band is not afraid to push the edge and bring a true rock feel to their music. Listeners are captivated by the edgy lyrics and you will find yourself wanting to dance along. Domino has the unique ability to make every audience member feel like, well, family. He shares the stories behind his songs and does so in a real and honest way.

Currently, Domino and FPFB are in the process of recording their first album “1806” at Mount Vernon studios with producer Jon Taylor. The Band also added a new member, Lora Markham on vocals to round out their sound. Domino released the first single, “Killing Floor” in May and the single can be found on iTunes. If the success of the song is any indication, the band has a hit on their hand. Domino and The Band are set to release the album in the Fall.
Venue Information:
Live Oak Music Hall
1311 Lipscomb Street
Fort Worth, TX, 76104
http://www.theliveoak.com/